Primary homework help 99

Barbican – a structure attached to the front of the castle walls that provided extra defence; it was sometimes part of the gatehouse
Bailey – a large courtyard inside the castle walls (also called a ward)
Bastion – a small tower at the end of a curtain wall; in a concentric castle, it’s built along the middle of the outside wall
Battering ram – a large, strong beam on wheels that was hit repeatedly against castle doors in order to break them down
Battlement – a narrow wall built along the outside edge of the wall walk, with merlons and embrasures on top that soldiers could use to defend the castle
Cannon – a weapon that used gunpowder to fire a ball of rock or metal at castle walls to destroy them. Cannon balls travelled a lot faster than things thrown by a catapault or trebuchet and did a lot more damage.
Catapult – a machine that could throw things at castle walls to destroy them
Concentric castle – a castle that was built with two or more curtain walls around it, giving many levels of defence to the castle
Curtain wall – a chain of walls, connected by towers, that were built around the keep and the castle courtyard
Drawbridge –  the bridge over the castle moat that could be raised or lowered, helping to keep enemies out
Dungeon – where prisoners were kept, usually located in the cellar of one of the towers
Embrasure – the name for the empty space in between merlons along a castle wall, in between battlements; someone could fire a weapon from an embrasure, then hide behind the merlon
Garderobe – the name for a toilet in the castle
Gatehouse – structures built to defend entrances to the castle, such as towers and bridges
Great Hall – a large room in the keep or another part of the castle where the lord had meetings and held banquets and celebrations
Keep – the main tower and stronghold inside the castle walls, where the lord lived
Loophole – a narrow slit in the castle walls that were used as windows, ventilation, or to shoot arrows through when defending the castle
Merlon – higher parts of the castle wall, in between battlements, that could be used to hide behind for protection when defending the castle; the spaces between merlons are called embrasures
Moat – a deep ditch filled with water that went all the way around the castle walls
Mortar – a mixture usually made from water, sand and lime that was used to build castle walls; it hardened in between the rocks to form a smooth barrier without any holes.
Motte – a large hill that the keep would be built on
Murder holes – holes in the ceilings of the castle entrance that rocks or hot oil could be poured through if invaders had entered
Portcullis – a gate that could slide up and down in front of the castle doors
Ramparts – steep defensive barriers or walls around castles
Siege tower – wooden towers on wheels that were built at the castle by the attackers so they’d be the same height as the castle walls; they gave the attackers an easy way to cross over the walls, and sometimes had battering rams in them  so the doors could be knocked down at the same time.
Tower – towers were built into castle walls, or around the outside of the keep; they were first built square, but then people found that round towers were actually harder to destroy because they didn’t have corners
Trebuchet – a big slingshot that could throw rocks, or even fireballs over the castle walls; it could shoot things farther than a catapult could
Turret – a small tower on top of one of the main towers of the castle, which provided a good lookout point for people to see any approaching enemies
Wall walk – a passageway along the top of the castle walls

Primary homework help 99

primary homework help 99

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