Paul rieckhoff essay

Obama’s presidency elides important aspects of the civil rights struggle, especially the teachings of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. King, for a time, served as the racial justice consciousness for two presidents — John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. Many who hoped Obama might be able to serve both roles — as president and racial justice advocate — have been disappointed. Yet there is a revelatory clarity in that disappointment, proving that Obama is not King or Frederick Douglass, but Abraham Lincoln, Kennedy and Johnson. Even a black president, perhaps especially a black president, could not untangle racism’s Gordian knot on the body politic. Yet in acknowledging the limitations of Obama’s presidency on healing racial divisions and the shortcomings of his policies in uplifting black America, we may reach a newfound political maturity that recognizes that no one person — no matter how powerful — can single-handedly rectify structures of inequality constructed over centuries.

Rieckhoff enlisted in the . Army Reserves in 1998 and completed Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training at Fort McClellan, Alabama. He then served in the Reserves, as a Specialist with the 812th Military Police Company. While working on Wall Street at . Morgan in 1999, Rieckhoff transferred to the New York Army National Guard, graduating from Officer Candidate School in June 2001 where he was named a Distinguished Military Graduate. Rieckhoff selected infantry as his branch and joined A Company, 1/105th INF (Light).

"Simple is better when something is so overwhelming, so complicated, so distant," Rieckhoff says of "American Sniper" blithely, with all the persuasive powers of the Ministry of Truth. In his opening paragraphs (if you can call them paragraphs), he announces that "the single best work of film about the Iraq War ever made" is "not a complex film." He states unabashedly that, in his opinion, the Iraq War's "best" cinematic telling thus far can be encapsulated for the American public through the "storytelling, action, emotion, production and performance, attention to detail and especially the frighteningly accurate soundscape" of a simple, "very black-and-white view" of the entire conflict. He goes on to say that this was not his view of the war, which apparently means that in his view, the "single best work of film about the Iraq War ever made" reflects essentially the same perspective that the government has been desperately pounding into American brains like so many weapons of mass destruction. Never mind the fact that Rieckhoff's casually blowing off every single other work of film about the Iraq War – he's actually calling for more of the black-and-white view that got the movie's protagonist to buy into his mission in the first place. He names the "power" of the movie as its "focused simplicity." He applauds director Clint Eastwood's efforts to make his film just like one of the classic Hollywood Westerns – which is exactly nothing like the actual Iraq War.

Paul rieckhoff essay

paul rieckhoff essay

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paul rieckhoff essay